Spanish Food

Being corny tastes so good at these 3 New Orleans Latin restaurants

In Louisiana, summertime means fresh, super sweet ears of homegrown corn. Add New Orleans’ love for Latin flavors and there’s serious eating to be done. Gratefully, other states’ growing seasons mean year ‘round availability so we never have to miss a bite. Check out these three New Orleans spots for some kernels of truth.

Maïs Arepas
$$ $$
Getting there
1200 Carondelet St, New Orleans, LA 70130, USA
Opening Hours
Mon Closed
Tue-Fri 11:30am–3pm, 5:30–10pm
Sat 11:30am–10pm
Sun 5–9:30pm
More Info
Website

(By Lorin Gaudin, Very Local New Orleans)

Mais Arepas – Beloved for skewers of plump corn cobs, cooked and finished on the grill and accompanied by two sauces: one that tastes like spices, mayo and a bit of ketchup; the other a deeper red-colored, slightly tart and buttery. A heavy shower of cotija gives richness. All plates are scraped clean of every morsel and drop. Don’t ask the chef his secret, he won’t tell. Trust me, I’ve tried many, many times.

Del Fuego NOLA
$$ $$
Getting there
4518 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70115, USA
Opening Hours
Mon Closed
Tue-Thu 12–8pm
Fri 12–9pm
Sat 12am–9pm
Sun Closed
More Info
Website

(By Lorin Gaudin, Very Local New Orleans)

Del Fuego Taqueria – Chef-Owner Dave “Fine Dining” Wright pulls deep from his love of Mexican street food for his sweet, whole cob Eloté striped with chipotle mayo, spices, chopped cilantro and fine crumbles of cotija. Squeezes of fresh lime give tart balance to the spicy, creamy works.

Catalino's
Getting there
7724 Maple St, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA
More Info
Website

(By Lorin Gaudin for Very Local New Orleans)

Catalino’s – The word is that in Guatemala, street corn is done with speed. Zip, zip, zip. Fresh cooked ears are covered in yellow mustard, ketchup, mayo, and cotija cheese. Catalino’s, New Orleans’ first Guatemalan restaurant, serves the exact thing, though slightly fancier with skewered cobs prettily plated. That yellow mustard is extremely interesting for its tangy complement to the sweetness of the corn, and it has me wondering… Mais Arepas’ secret ingredient? Hmmm.