Causes/Activism, Food

New Orleans City Council Approves Domino’s Pothole Grant

A busy meeting was capped off by the decision to allow Domino’s Pizza to take a swing at some potholes.

The results of the most recent New Orleans City Council will likely prove positive for the city. Council members approved a resolution seeking solutions to address childhood trauma, a proposal that could allow for more affordable housing in the city and a $5,000 grant from Domino’s to repair to fix several of the city’s tire-eating monstrosities.

New Orleans won the pizza chain’s Paving for Pizza contest, and the council voted unanimously to approve the grant to the Department of Public Works.

Domino’s explained why they are getting into the infrastructure game on their contest website.

“We can’t stand by and let your cheese slide to one side, your toppings get un-topped or your boxes get flipped, so we’re helping to pave in in towns across the country to save your good pizza from these bad roads,” the company said.

In a city where pothole repair elicits great rejoicing, perhaps the most championed council votes had nothing to do with our crumbling roads.

The council approved a resolution asking that the Children and Youth Planning Board examine issues surrounding childhood trauma and provide recommendations. Community leaders from Central City and nonprofits working toward appropriate treatment of children in the justice system pleaded their case before the council, noting the many ways that growing up around violence and traumatic events can set children on a bad path. The council agreed with the presenters and encouraged the aforementioned agencies to provide potential solutions.

Council members also approved a proposal to advance a new affordable housing initiative. The proposal gives the council several options to enforce the requirement for new housing developments with at least 10 units to designate at least 12 percent of the units as affordable (or below market value).

NOLA.com reports that several council members expressed concern over how broad the proposal was, pointing out the fact that council members could create “affordable housing districts” as small as a single parcel of land, giving the ability to apply standards to some developments and not others.

However, the proposal was approved so that the City Planning Commission could move ahead with researching potential ways that the affordable housing initiatives could be enforced.